Stories of Abandonment

When I hear the word abandonment, I always think of the One Child Policy and attribute it to my own misfortunes. However, this policy may not have been the reasoning for my abandonment. In a recent article that I read published on March 28, 2014 entitled Chinese Parents Abandon Children at Guangzhou Baby Hatch hosted, I learned several reasoning’s for children being forfeited by parents in China. Most of these children had some type of disabilities or illness that could not be treated. Some families did not have the funds to support a special needs child. In one particular case, a mother took her son who seemed to be around the age of four, to the designated drop off point. The article states that she had some type of crippling illness of her own and could not properly raise the child. The only hope for these children are in the hands of complete strangers.

Most of these families had a look of anguish on their faces which makes me think of what my parent(s) might have gone through. Did my parent(s) not have the resources to care for me, or maybe they had some type of crippling illness that prevented them from raising an infant? I do not believe my parent(s) abandoned me because of any visible handicaps or illnesses. My friend Catherine has an idea of why a parent(s) may abandon their child. A member of the adoption agency informed her family of the possibility of fleeing families. These families that attempted to flee Royaltyeither abandoned their child in fear that that child would be too much of a reliability or the families had their child taken from them when the escape attempted failed. Another possibility for my abandonment is more despairing than the other theories. This theory involves my mother being either a prostitute or a victim of the sex slave industry. Hopefully neither of these ideas hold true.

A small positive outcome from my uncertain past is the fact that I can fabricate my own origins. Here is a story I imagined when I was younger. It starts with me being a descendant of royalty or from a wealthy family. I was captured by a fiend that was going to use me for ransom, but the plan fell short when he lost me. I was mistaken for another abandoned baby and taken to the orphanage. My parents were not able to find me, and as a result believed I was dead. Unbeknownst to them, I was taken to a distant land. As I got older, my stories became more elaborate with one story including being a test tube clone baby. Until the true reasoning for my abandonment is revealed, I will continue to create stories for myself. I might as well have some fun with my past.

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One thought on “Stories of Abandonment

  1. While in China adopting our first daughter (2002), I met a newly adopting father in passing, who’s infant daughter had a note hidden under her clothes. Her new parents had someone in the hotel translate it for them, as opposed to their guide, for fear of what was written in it.

    The note was from the babies father, and told them her mother had died during childbirth. She had two other brothers, but they couldn’t care for her therefore had sent her the orphanage hoping she would be adopted. The note told they loved her, and wished they could keep her but knew she would have a better life with a mother. He even gave their names and address hoping for contact.

    My response was full of excitement and joy for their new child, knowing she would have some sort of connection, however small it was. And giving her a chance to learn “her” story in the future. However, the father was horrified that someone would find out and not let the adoption go through, as the Hague treaty states that children that are adopted must be orphans with no birth family to care for them. Strange that he told me about it though (we met an internet cafe.)

    My point of telling you this is even 12 years ago, illness or death were reasons for children being abandoned. Hope it helps.

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